Vintage Spanners Home
Contact Us

Vintage Jacks in Australia

Pictured below are items from of our collection of jacks, and some sent in by other collectors

Information has been gleaned from a variety of sources, and we make no gaurantees as to accuracy of information.

Further information, and additional pictures of jacks are welcomed.

Where we have made statements or assumptions in error, corrections etc are invited.

Viewers who are interested in jacks can make contact on the link above.
A forum for discussing all things relating to lifting jacks has been created apply here to join

Australian Jacks --- Overseas Jacks ---- Unknown Provenance

List of known Australian Makers:

APAC
APAC-CLYDE (see APAC)
Benbar (Bennet & Barkell Ltd)
BK (Bradford & Kendall Ltd, also Bradken Consolidated Ltd
CLYDE-APAC (see APAC)
COXHEAD
DAWN
DONALDS
EZELIFT
EZY-LIFT
FORD
FORDHAM
GMH
HOLDEN - See APAC and WYLIE
HUMBLE '&' NICHOLSON (wagon jack seen)
JOPLIN Bros
LIGHTBURN (LIGHTNING)
LIGHTNING (LIGHTBURN)
NASCO (LIGHTNING?)
NBK no info
NEWLEX
OVEREND, A & Co Brisbane
PEL
QUICKLIFT (FORDHAM)
RITCH
SEMAPHORE
SERVEX
TREWHELLA
VESTA
WHYLIE
Wagon jacks Blacksmith made

AUSTRALIAN MAKERS
   

Picture Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

APAC heavy duty garage jack, mechanical operation, uses rack & pinion mechanism

Picture Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

APAC garage jack, mechanical operation, very early production.

APAC A Adaptable Garage Jack © Ozwrenches

Listed in Bevan & Edwards catalogue c 1930's "Universal Garage Jacks suitable for any make of car, irrespective of axle height or position of petrol tank. Simply push the jack under the car by the lever handle, raise the crutch into position by the chain provided, and a single downward stroke lifts the car. Maximum lifting range is always available by bringing the crutch into contact with the axle before lifting. Will pass under axles from 5 to 18 inches from ground, lift 4 inches, Price, 4/10/- complete.

Note the similarity a jack by Harvey Frost makers, in the UK

Harvey Frost Garage Jack

APAC A Garage Jack, four wheeled version. picture courtesy Barry Pye
APAC Garage Jack, two wheeled version. picture courtesy David Kelly

Pictures Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

APAC side lift jack.

 

 

Photo © Ozwrenches.

Apac Hydraulic Bumper Jack Model A1BJ

 

Photo © Ozwrenches.

APAC Jack, not numbered(1).

This jack takes a 3/4 inch square drive handle (unlike many similar which use an 11/16" handle).

Pictured below is a handle with a 3/4" square drive.

Photo © Ozwrenches.

Screw Jack marked "For Comercial Vehicles APAC JACK Up to 3 Tons"

The ratcheting mechanism is very similar to that used on the SERVEX below - not
known if there is a connection.

Photo © Ozwrenches.

Apac Jack, not numbered(2), single lift, 7.75" low height, 12.5 " raised,

Photo © Ozwrenches.

The tools above came with a 1934 Chev sedan. Oiler is unmarked, crank has "GMH"

Photo © Ozwrenches.

Apac not Numbered 1 & 2 compared (also shown above)

Photo © Ozwrenches.

Apac side lift screw jack. Requires a ratchet handle to operate a square drive.

Note the remains of a decal showing APAC Industries - this is the only ID on the jack.

It stands over 21 inches tall, and can lift to most of that height. Note also that there is a rubber bumper to protect the car's paintwork in operation.

Some basic stats to compare with yours:

Overall height 21 and 1/2 inches.
Lifting arm 7/8" dia, solid round bar 8 and 1/2 inches total length, can swing up and down.
Drive 1/2 inch square, requires a ratchet handle.
Fixed foot 8 inches wide.
Screw dia.  

1/2 inch outer dia.

Info sought as to what makes and models this was supplied for.

New info suggests that this jack was supplied with the Austin 1800 in Australia.

More info from Julio Carbone "I have one of these which was supplied with a 1971 Austin 1800 in Adelaide"

Similar but shorter jack for MGB - Mark 11 roadster, CKD production, produced in Sydney in the period July/August 1969. Info supplied by Roger Taylor and is shown on Steve Gyles' fabulous MG website on this webpage,

 

 

Photo © Ozwrenches.

Apac Side Lift Jack for Morris Mini and others in the family.

The wheel brace which doubles as the jack winder is shown alongside.

Some stats; Height is 18" to top of winder nut. Base is 6" across, underside of base has 4 protruding dimples at each end.

Photo © Ozwrenches.

Apac Side Lift Jack for Morris Mini and others in the family.

It has the remains of an APAC Transfer / Decal on the back sidesimilar to the one above.

The wheel brace which doubles as the jack winder is shown alongside.

Some stats; Height is 18" to top of winder nut. Base is 6" across, underside of base has 4 protruding dimples at each end.

 

Gone to a new home

 

Pics Courtesy Brendon Hammersley

This jack was supplied with a 1971 MGB, assembled in Australia.

It is very similar to the one above, but height is 17.5 inches as per the MGB MK11 roadster, CKD production, produced in Sydney in the period July/August 1969. Info supplied by Roger Taylor and is shown on Steve Gyles' fabulous MG website on this webpage,

Overall height 17 and 1/8 inches
Lifting arm 10 and 5/8 inches outer end point from upright face
Lifting arm pin to end point 4 and 1/16 inches
Protective pad face to upright face  1 and 3/16 inches

 

Photo Courtesy © John Hawking

Apac Ltd commenced life in a small workshop in Adelaide, then in 1923 relocating to new facilities at Finsbury, a suburb of Adelaide. At this time they merged with Lightburn Engineering Manufacturing Company Ltd, (LEMCOL) to form Apac Industries Ltd, becoming a listed company. A further move to a large industrial complex in 1945 occurred when the North Woodville industrial corridor was developed and opened to industry. Apac Industries Pty Ltd became the first member of NSW engineering group Clyde Industries when it was acquired in 1954. After that, the company was known as Clyde-Apac and continued jack production.
1945 Apac supplied the first Holden car produced in SA with a jack. ref Clyde Apac

APAC No 2 mechanical jack

Listed as: single lift, capacity 1,500 lb, low height - 7", raised - 12"

The Apac decal can be seen centre left, hard to find one intact like this.

Anothe decal from a blue No 2 reads "High Grade APAC Mechanical Jack" image supplied by Dion Rinaldi

Apac No 10 Double Lift jack, Pictures Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Apac No 10 jack Pictures Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

APAC No A10D hydraulic jack

Photo Courtesy © John Hawking

Listed as: Twin lift, 2 ton, low height - 5-1/2", raised height 14-1/8" , includes 2-1/8" extension screw movement, hydraulic lift 6-1/2"

Pictures Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Apac No 11 screw jack

Photo Courtesy © John Hawking

APAC No 12 screw jack - 5-1/4" to 12" see advertising below.

Low height: 5-1/4 ins

Raised: 12 ins

41 ins folding brace handle 3/8 in dia, 11/16 in sq end

Photo © Ozwrenches

APAC No 12F fabricated jack.

Very similar to APAC No 145F pictured below

 

APAC Screw Jack No 15 © Ozwrenches

Left - Photo Courtesy © John Hawking

Listed as APAC No 17 jack - Twin lift, 2000 lb capacity Low height - 5", raised - 11.25"

Looks identical to No 37 below

 

Photo above © Ozwrenches picture of a model 17 type without the cage hook as per the one on left. The reason there is no cage hook is now apparent - observe inside the winding aperture, the access hole is rotated 15 degrees. In operation, this would have the effect of capturing the square nut at the end of the winder once the winder is withdrawn, thus enabling withdrawral of the jack from beneath the car by pulling on the handle - similar effect to the others which have a cage hook at the base.

 

Photo Courtesy © John Hawking

Listed as APAC No 17 jack - Twin lift, 2000 lb capacity Low height - 5", raised - 11.25"

Looks very similar to to the one above, but with pull out cage to enable jack to be pulled from beneath car with the winding handle.

Photos © Ozwrenches.

Apac (No 17 type) blue twin lift screw type jack, with the solid pull out cage. No number visible on the decal which reads:

"High Grade APAC Mechanical Jack, made in Australia by APAC Industries Ltd ." There may be more, but paint has hidden it if so.

Pic Courtesy ©earlyholdens.com

Apac No 17 Screw jack, with the pull out cage, nicely restored.

Not sure if there was a different model number for this compared with the No 17 above which does not have the pull out cage, but relies on a recess in the winder housing to allow pull out.

Info required.

 

Pictures Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Apac No 25 screw jack

Pictures Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Apac No 26 M/7672 screw jack

Photos © Ozwrenches.

Apac No 26 M/7672 screw jack - this may be a variation on the one above
or it may be that the one above is missing the side brackets.

Waiting for photo

Catalogue Picture of APAC No 37 jack - twin lift, 2000 lb capacity Low height - 5", raised - 11.25"

- looks identical to No 17 above

Pics courtesy Geoff & Karen

CLYDE -APAC Industries No 37, triple lift screw jack, with partial decal.

Note the differences between this example and the catalogue picture above.

The advert states twin lift, and has no pull out cage shown. This one is triple lift and has a solid pull out cage.

It seems strange that APAC / Clyde would use the same model number for two quite differen jacks.

 

Picture Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Apac jamtin jack marked "APAC JACK, CLYDE-APAC LIMITED WOODVILLE NORTH SA
Capacity 2000 lbs, Model number 58"

There may be another digit or letter after 58, but not sure as there is damage to the paintwork in that place'

Photo © Ozwrenches.

1949 Catalogue Picture of APAC No 70,

Photo © Ozwrenches.

APAC Model 75TL screw jack by Clyde-Apac, Woodville South Ausrtralia

Apac Safety Stand Model No 76

Advrtising from 1972

Picture Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Listed as APAC No 85 3 ton jack

Picture Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Listed as APAC No 90 5 ton jack.

Picture Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Apac No 98

Pictures© Ozwrenches.

(APAC) No 102

Note that this example does not have the APAC name

1949 Catalogue Picture of APAC No 102

Pictures Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi
At left, Apac screw jack marked "No 103", it has a flip over top
Below No 103 flat top version of the one seen at left. No info on these.

Photo Courtesy © John Hawking

APAC Screw Jack No 111.

McPhersons 1949 listing shows it as 5-1/2" - 12", 40" folding handle(3/8"), 11/16" square end.

Pictures Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

APAC No 135 screw jack

Photo Courtesy © John Hawking

Listed as APAC No 145 jack - Triple lift, 2,500 lb capacity, ball mounted thrust race. Low height - 5-3/8", raised - 14-1/2"

41 ins folding brace handle, 3/8 in diam, 11/16 in square end see catalogue picture below.

Apac No 145 variation 2 Picture Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Photo © Ozwrenches.

This one is thought to be for the FX - 48-215 Holden (48 - 50 series) still has residual blue paint finish.

Motor Spares Catalogue listing from 1949 (below) indicates that this is a APAC No 145F jack

Photo © Ozwrenches.

Looks to be a variation on the No 145F above

Notes - twin lift, low height = 9-1/4" - raised = 18"

No catalogue listing found to date.

Photo © Ozwrenches.

No 150 (APAC?) but not named

Below, two variations od the No 150 Picture Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Picture Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

APAC No 155, with an unusual flip top.

Picture Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

APAC No 155D, variation on the one above, number slightly different, without the flip top.

Photo © Ozwrenches.

Apac Jack No 160 (similar to No's 12 & 175)

Capacity: 3,000 lbs
Low height: 8-1/2 ins
Raised: 16 ins
48 in folding brace handle 7/16 in dia, 11/16 sq end

Picture Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Apac No 162A with flip top attachment
Note fabricated body of jack is very similar to #145 series above

Picture Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Apac No 162A with flip top attachment
Note cast body of jack is very similar to #160 above.

Spec's: No 162A, Twin Lift, Thrust Race: Ball Mounted, Capacity: 3,000 lbs

Low height: 6 in, Raised Height: 13-9/16 in, Ext Cap: 1-5/8 in, Handle: 48 in folding brace

Picture Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Two Apac No 175 jacks with variations in number placement.

Capacity 3,000 lbs

Low height: 7 ins

Raised height: 16 ins

48 in folding brace handle, 7/16 in dia, 11/16 in sq end

 

  Photos © Ozwrenches.

APAC No 177 D^D. This is a heavy twin lift screw jack, with the D^D mark cast into the base - a special order for the Military no doubt - no catalogue listing found so far in civilian catalogues.

Low height is 9-1/2inches. fully raised is 21 inches, drive socket is about 7/8".

The handle is of square bar, approx 7/8inches and 45 inches long with a circular hole at the other end for a bar of some sort - see pic of handle below.

Bottom Left - jack seen on a recent trip in the Military museum in Darwin - it was in a bunch of tools displayed for the Army Blitz

It appears to be the same as the Apac No 177 above.

Photo © Ozwrenches.

APAC No 192 bumper jack, friction lift.

Type: Bumper Lift
Capacity: Passenger Cars
Low Height: 4-3/8 inches
Raised Height: 28-3/4 inches
Handle: 20 inch round bar

Picture Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

APAC No 193 bumper jack, friction lift.

Awaiting Picture
Bumper Jack No 195

Pictures Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Bumper Jack No 199 (APAC) Screw with ratchet

Picture Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Apac No 215 screw jack

Picture Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Apac No 216 screw jack

Pic courtesy © Dion Rinaldi - APAC No 220 Jack

Pic courtesy © Dion Rinaldi - APAC No 220 Jack

Pic courtesy © Dion Rinaldi - APAC No 222 Jack

Pic courtesy © Dion Rinaldi - APAC No 222 Jack

Pic courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

APAC No 226 - two variations

Pictured below is a handle to fit the no 220, 222 & 226. Note the brackets hold

a sliding bar which extends out in action, but slides in for stowing.

Apac Hydraulic Kerb Jacks, 2 examples

Pics courtesy Daryl Hetherington

Apac Hydraulic Kerb Jack Nameplate

Pic © Ozwrenches.

Apac Safety Stand Model No 385

Height 12"; Raise, 7-1/2"; Full height 19-1/2"; Capacity per pair, 8,000 lbs

Advertising from 1972 below

 

 

Seen at left is a pair of APAC No 385 jack stands restored by Frankston identity John Billing.

John can be contacted on this link: John Billing Solutions if you need a restoration job done, a video made, some photography, music or a beach cleaned up - John is your man! Check it out and make contact.

Awaiting Picture

Apac Bumber Bar Jack

Model No 436, Hydraulic type, passenger cars
Hydraulic lift 16 inches, Full lifting range 4 to 34 inches.

Pic Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

(APAC) No 810 Jack, also seen marked Apac / 800

Pic Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

APAC No 810 Jack

Pic © Ozwrenches.

APAC No 810 Jack - Flip Top, variation on the one above

Listed in Apac brochures as: No 810

Type - Single Lift

Capacity - 5000lbs

Low height - 9 in

Raised Height - 15 1/2 in

Ext Cap - 2 in

Handle - 24 in two piece T

Picture Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

APAC No M/7457 Screw Jack

Info sought

Pic © Ozwrenches.

Apac No 211 Bumper Lift Jack supplied with Model XB Falcon and derivatives.

Also sold by Repco as a Bumper Lift Jack for Passenger Cars

Listed in 1970 Repco Catalogue with the following stats:
"Passenger Car Jack. Type - Bumper Lift, Capacity - Passenger Cars, Low Height - 7-1/4"
Raised Height - 31-1/2", Lift - 23-1/4", Handle - P/N 9951"

Note that this type has a sloping lifting cradle to engage the back sloping bumpers on these early Ford cars.

Pic © Ozwrenches.

Apac Bumper Lift Jack

I am told that this was for the XC Falcon, which had small slots in the bumper to accommodate this jack. There may be other models applicable. Info invited.

Note that this type has a thin finger to engage a slot in bumpers on these early Ford cars.

Pic © Ozwrenches.

Toyota Compound Scissors Jack Mfg CLYDE-APAC.

Not sure which model Toyota this was supplied with.

Pictures Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

APAC TWIN LIFT

No model number marked, uncommon

 

Pic © Craig Gillingham.

Apac Side Lift Jack for Beetle Volks Wagon cars.
The protruding I beam shaped member engaged the tube under the car sills.
Lift was achieved by friction. They usually had a warning - "do not oil"

Below: Pic © Ozwrenches.
Apac VW jack beside a Bilstein VW jack.
Note the close similarities.

 

Pic © Ozwrenches

Benbar No 2 Jack

Benbar was a trading name for Bennett & Barkell Ltd, 124 - 132 Castlereagh St, Sydney
Active from early 1900's to 1971 when they were taken over by Bennett & Wood.
In the early days the company were into bicycle manufacture, motorcycle manufacture and accessories
for the motorist of the highest quality (B & B advertising) ref - Trove

Pictures Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Benbar Minor screw jack. Benbar was a trading name for Bennett & Barkell Ltd, see more info above.

Picture Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

BK

Bradford Kendall Ltd, later Bradken Consolidated Ltd, taken over by Western Consolidated Industries Pty Limited on 28/6/1978.

BK are famous for their cast anvils ranging from 7 - 448 lbs, Leg Vices and now Lifting Jacks

BK were Bradford Kendall Limited : steel founders & engineers

   

Picture Blue jack Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

D^D 3 Tons (ARMY) Screw Jack

Info sought: Response from Brian Cook - he has an identical one with Joplin in raised letters down one side.

Further info also from Brian - this jack is mentioned here http://mapleleafup.net/forums/showthread.php?p=208386 asy WW2 Vintage supplied with Australian "Light personnel carriers".  

Picture of the red Joplin from a forum ©David Gordon

Photo © Ozwrenches.

This jack appears to be very similar to the Joplin army jack shown above, however there are no markings, and the winder was hook shaped (the adaptor is only held in with a grub screw and could easily be returned to a square drive). It still has remnants of red paint as per the Joplin pictured above.

 

Photo © Ozwrenches.

Previous owner stated that this jack came with his 1961 Ford Cortina MK 1 - (dates from 1961-65) No maker shown.

Photo © Ozwrenches.

A selection of jacks from the collection of Adrian Bennet of Barooga, displayed at the Echuca Steam Ralley, June 2008.

 

Picture Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Small Dawn Bottle Jack

Large one - Photo © Ozwrenches.

Dawn Bottle Jack or Wagon Jack

Photographed at the National Engine Rally, Fairbridge WA, Sept 2011
from the collection of Neil Cummings

Below - Dawn 3 ton bottle jack. Picture Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Photos Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Donalds No 2 6 ton jack.

Marked PADD (Paddington) Sydney.

Photo © Ozwrenches.

This jack is only marked "2", but it is identical to "EZELIFT" No 2 as listed in 1937 McPherson's catalogue.

We don't know who made them but suspect Trewhella, confirmation sought.

Photo © Ozwrenches.

EZELIFT X screw jack

Photos Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Writing stamped on this jack similar to a Trewhella Wallaby Jacks reads:

EZY-LIFT., R C McMILLAN, EAST OAKLEIGH., VIC

Advertising for Ezy-Lift screw jacks can be found in 1937 McPherson's Cats
Advertising for Ezy-Lift "Wallaby Type" jacks can be found in newspaper entries from 1946 to 1954 as
seen on Trove

 

Photo © Ozwrenches.

Model - Econovan80 / Spectron

Part Number SB39 37 790

Safe Working Load 1600Kg

Make FORD

Photo © Ozwrenches.

Safe Working Load 800Kg

FORD Motor Co Aust Ltd Pt No 84DA-17080-AA

Model - FALCON - XD XE XF

FAIRLANE - ZJ ZK ZL

LTD - FC FD FE

Waiting for pictures

Refer also to Quicklift

Fordham Jacks

Fordham Engineering Pty. Ltd.

About Us

Since 1936, Fordham Engineering has excelled in the design and manufacture of quality hydraulic jacks and special lifting equipment. The Fordham range includes small automotive jacks and peaks with large jacks designed to support military and commercial aircraft. All Fordham jacks are Australian-made and designed, with product development and testing carried out at Fordham's own modern engineering and manufacturing facility at Melbourne, Australia. Repair and Overhaul Replacement Parts Special Lifting Equipment Not only do we design & manufacture new equipment, we specialize in the repair and overhaul of all types of jacks, including testing & certification to 100 US Ton. We can arrange pick-up and re-delivery with quick turn-around time from anywhere in Australia.

http://www.fordhamengineering.com.au/

Photo Courtesy © earlyholdens.com, used with permission

Advertising from NASCO Accelerator magazine from December 1936 Volume 2, Number 1 edition.

Seeking a photo of this jack

Photo Courtesy © earlyholdens.com, used with permission. Advertising from NASCO Accelerator magazine from December 1936 Volume 2, Number 1 edition.

Seeking a photo of this jack

Photo Courtesy © earlyholdens.com, used with permission. Advertising from NASCO Accelerator magazine from December 1936 Volume 2, Number 1 edition.

Seeking a photo of this jack

Photo Courtesy © earlyholdens.com, used with permission. Advertising from NASCO Accelerator magazine from December 1936 Volume 2, Number 1 edition.

Note in the advertising above from 1936, Nasco supplied Apac No 25 jacks for their Chevrolet models 1932 - 1934, as Part No M3021 & M3451.

Other vehicles supplied with Part No 3451 were Maple Leaf Trucks, G.M.C. trucks, Oldsmobile Truck, Bedford Trucks all from around the same time frame.

   

Photo © Ozwrenches.

Humble & Nicholson bottle jack or wagon jack.

Humble & Nicholson are famous for their wool presses.

Photographed at the National Engine Rally, Fairbridge WA, Sept 2011

from the collection of Neil Cummings

Picture Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Joplin Balloon

Pic courtesy © Dion Rinaldi, Bentwood No 41 and similar Empire No 41

Pic courtesy © Dion RinaldiBentwood No 41 and similar Empire No 41

Pic courtesy © Dion Rinaldi - Two Joplin Bros Jacks

Pic courtesy © Dion Rinaldi - Two Joplin Bros Artric No 42 and Joplin No 46 Jacks

Pics© Ozwrenches

Screw Jack marked BENTWOOD / JUNIOR

Thought to be a Joplin jack, see above for other Bentwwon jacks

Picture from Motor Spares Catalogue dated June 1939
Showing the Empire No 41 to be a Joplin Jack

Picture from Motor Spares Catalogue dated June 1939
The No 46 shown with the wide cage is also a Joplin Jack.

Pic Courtesy © Tony Danaro

Joplin Sydney Australia "A" Frame Screw jack.

Type : A' Frame, Height : 20 & 1/2"

Base : 8 & 1/4 wide measured at the feet, 8 wide measured at the base excluding the two feet. Base is 3/4 thick at thickest point, excluding feet. The two feet welded to the base are 3 wide by 2 & 3/4 thick. Feet bottom have 10 grip teeth on each foot on the base in a ::::: ::::: patten.

Screw Drive Head : Hex head of 3/4 AF dimension
Lifting Arm : 6 & 3/4 measured from centre of vertical screw drive to tip of arm/spigot
Spigot : Round solid steel rod of 1 diameter with a locating pin located 2 & 1/2 from the end. The spigot pin is 1/8 diameter and the spigot end has a 1/61 camber.
A' frame side arms : Solid steel rod of 7/16 diameter welded through top shoulder and welded to base. The base in turn has two separate stabilising feed welded either side of base.
Original Paint (as far as can be determined) : Semi-gloss black

Notes from Tony: "I do not know what cars this jack was part of. I purchased this jack because it had a similar look to Jaguar A frame jacks. At the time I could not identify the make due to the surface rust and location of the markings. As I was cleaning a bit at the base, I noticed the markings and was surprised at the fact that it was Australian made as I was not aware of Australian made A' frame jacks which were typical of those used on the English cars. Joplin still exists and makes more hydraulic jacks. The age and type suggest that this jack was made in the 50's or 60's obviously for an English designed car but made in Australia. Australia made a huge range of English cars in the 50's, 60's and 70's from full manufacturing as was the case with the Nuffield organisation and later BMC/Leyland to the assembly of CKD kits. Australian content was a big issue of the day and with high traiffs at the time and maximising Australian content was a key driver and as such making things such as the Jack in Australia was an obvious option to reduce costs and maximise Australian content. The A' frame part of the jack is dimensionally similar to the Jaguar MKII King Dick jack. The similarity to the Jaguar MKII jack was the reason for me purchasing this jack".

Photo Courtesy Jordan

Lightburn hydraulic jack

It has a screw out component as well as the hydraulic lift.

The Museum, Victoria have a pamphlet from approx 1967.

The company states on the cover: " There's a reliable LIGHTBURN HYDRAULIC JACK for every vehicle! 15 MODELS TO CHOOSE FROM"

This one appears to be in the A2-A5 range.

A search on Free Patents Online (FPO) reveals that a US patent was granted for this jack in 1949.

United States Patent 2,466,815 for: This invention relates to improvements in hydraulic jacks, and in particular it relates to improvements in the housing of jacks and to the control mechanism whereby the jack is actuated.

The patent was applied for in 1944 in Australia and in 1945 in the US, and granted in 1949 in the US, to Harold Anderton Lightburn of Henley Beach, South Australia.

We are continuing our research into the timelines of this company - any info is welcomed.

 

Lightburn has another patent for a bumper jack in 1974.

 

 

Lightburn advertising from a 1963 McLean Bros & Rigg Catalogue showing 8 models available

Photo © Ozwrenches

Note that in 1954 Lightburn Jacks were advertised as "LIGHTNING" hydraulic jacks

Pictured at right is an example "A3" this is a 3 ton model.

Photo © Ozwrenches

Lightburn / Lightning Jack No D2.

This is from their "D" series

Photo © Ozwrenches

Lightburn Jack No 7T (7 Ton). Note in the picture lower left - it has a racing stripe, similar to the Nasco version (lower down).

Photo © Ozwrenches

Lightburn / Lightning Hydraulic Bumper Jack

Marked Pat Appn No 21786, 16141/44

Note that the base plate is missing.

Sometimes sold on Ebay as a Falcon Jack.

Photos © Ozwrenches

The Nasco Jack on left looks to be an early type with the socket housing for the bar welded to the body. This may have been an unsuccessful design feature as note in the picture below, the two on the left are of this type and the housing has failed in use and had welded repairs.

The one on the right is thought to be of later design, where the housing socket for the bar is more substantial and utilizes the strength of the body. (See also below, next row)

Note that both types have a button riveted onto the bottom plate which states "Pat 28/8/44 122,950, Reg 21788"

Note also that the one on the far left has no button and no evidence of having lost one.

Note also that the later one has ha body redesign as well as the bar socket.

It is assumed that these were made to order for Nasco by Lightning due to similarities, info needed.

Photos © Ozwrenches

Thought to be a later version of the Nasco Jack due to the re-designed and strengthened socket for the bar.

Note that both types have a button riveted onto the bottom plate which states "Pat 28/8/44 122,950, Reg 21788"

Not evident in these pictures but this jack has remnants of a black racing stripe

Pic © www.earlyholdens.com, used with permission.

Note the Nasco jack on the right still has remnants of two decals, and it also has a black racing stripe

The jack on the left is an Apac model 401

 

Seen below, left is an advertising display board for Nasco jacks - another image supplied by © www.earlyholdens.com, used with their kind permission.

Immediately below - extract fro Magazine Wheels, March 1956. Advertisement depicts 3 different Apac jacks, with a model 401 in the boot of a car - possibly FJ Holden.

Pic © www.earlyholdens.com, used with permission.

November 1950 internal GMH advertisement

Pic © www.earlyholdens.com, used with permission.

Early '50's salesman reference

Pic © www.earlyholdens.com, used with permission.

 

Pic © www.earlyholdens.com, used with permission.

This service bulleting from 1964 shows a Nasco jack with a quite different jacking socket to the ones pictured above. Note also that the description states that this new design has a body made of high tensile aluminium for toughness and light weight.

 

 

Pic © www.earlyholdens.com, used with permission.

This advertising describes the body as "All-steel longlife construction". Note also that prices are in LSD, so prior to decimal currency introduced in Feb 1966.

Note also the placement of the decal and the black racing stripe.

 

 

NASCO Hydraulic Jacks

 

Advertising from the "Barrier Miner" Friday 9 August 1946, page 1, image from TROVE.

Note the similarity to Lightning / Lightburn jacks - it is thought that they were the supplier. Not known if the Nasco item was so marked, but the Lightburn ones do not have any marks that we have seen.

More info required.

Pics courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

NSWG ( New South Wales Government Railways) squat screw jack, probably made in-house

Pic courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Screw Jack Marked only MIDGET.

It looks very similar to the Speed down below

Pic courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Ratchet Screw Jack Marked A. Overend & Co Brisbane

Info required

Pic courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

PEL S700 Screw jack

"PEL was Pacific Engineering Limited. Set up in Townsville after WW11 by two American servicemen who stayed here after the war. They made lots of things and were quite successful. I Saw another PEL jack on weekend and also a PEL bicycle" (DR).

Pic courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

PEL T400 Screw jack

Photo © Ozwrenches.

Quicklift hydraulic jack marked : "QUICK LIFT 3 MADE IN AUST 3" at the top and "SINGLE LIFT 3 TON" at the foot.

Quicklift jacks were manufactured by Eric Fordham, Engineer, 89-93 Curzon St, Nth Melbourne.

See brochure below: range stated as from 2 Ton to 30 Ton

 

Pics courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

SERVEX 1 Screw Jack - showing two variations to the winding gear,

Below - the two at right, with an unmarked jack (black) which looks to be Servex also

Bottom - Servex similar to the ones at left, but it only has the number 1, no Servex name.

Info sought

Pics courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

SERVEX 2 Screw Jack

Pic courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

SERVEX N0 8 Screw Jack with capstan top gear

Listed as "Single Lift Heavy Duty Truck Jack"

Pics courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Servex No 10 at left and below with an un marked one.

Listed as "Commercial Truck Jack"

Photo © Ozwrenches.

Servex No 12, about 8 inches tall, has a sideways motion with automatic locking to stop unwinding.

No catalogue references found so far.

If you can help, please make contact on the link above.

Similar to the unmarked one beside the No 10 above.

Photo © Ozwrenches.

Looks to be a Servex, going by the mechanism. About 10 inches tall, has a sideways motion with automatic locking to stop unwinding.

No catalogue references found so far.

If you can help, please make contact on the link above.

Silver Seal 8CT / Australian Made (CT may mean CWT)

Base 11cm x 7.5cm, Lowered height - 17cm - 6 1/2", Extended height - 28cm - 11", Weight  1.6kg

Note the similarity to the Speed below and the Midget above

 

 

Pics Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Screw Jack marked SPEED 1 AUSTRALIAN MADE

No info, please make contact if you can ad something on this brand.

third picture shows the Speed beside look-alike marked Midget - info sought

Pics Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Trewhella 10 Ton Monkey Jack.

It has 4 different Patents listed in the casting ranging from 1904 - 1908.

Pics Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Trewhella 6 ton No DA 5724.

This is one with wooden components surrounding the lifting ratchets.

 

Pics Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Trewhella No 101

Ratchet Type Jack by Trewhella Brothers of Trentham, Victoria

Pics Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Trewhella side handle

Ratchet Type Jack by Trewhella Brothers of Trentham, Victoria

Also shown below on the left

Pics Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Trewhella side handle

Ratchet Type Jacks by Trewhella Brothers of Trentham, Victoria. The inscription below is on the jack on the right.

Pics Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Trewhella Bros 5 Ton bottle jack

Pics Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Trewhella Bros Wallaby Special Patent Trentham Australia.

Double purchase jack, heavy and made for heavy work.

This is the "BA" model which will lift 6 tons and weighs 79 lbs.

Not pictured, but similar jack is the "B" model which will lift 4 tons and weighs 65 lbs.

Photo © Ozwrenches.

 

 

This jack was marketed as a safety jack.

In the case of this one, there has been some welding needed to fix the fingers which grip the chain - all the hype in the advertising can't hide the fact that this component is rather flimsy.

Perhaps that was the reason it was only in production for a short period?

Vesta Triangle Safety Jacks

Advertising from the "West Australian" Sat. 11 August 1951, image from TROVE

Further advertising states " The Vesta Triangle Safety Jack consists of two steel rods and a chain. Turning the crank handle raises the car effortlessly at two points of suspension - the axle and the bumper bar. It's safe on steeply cambered roads, on a hill, in mud, sand etc. It will pass under a 2in. clearance while operator stands clear of car! A child of 12 could raise a wheel with a Vesta Safety Jack without difficulty or danger in a few seconds. No uncomfortable stooping, practically effortless operation, speedy and safe - surely it's the perfect jack..."

Vesta were battery makers with over 7000 dealers throughout Austrlia, and in 1954 they offered participants in the REDEX Car trials "day and night Vesta Service Facilities for all competitors in almost every town on the route. Vesta Service covers a full and comprehensive range of products - Batteries, Coils, Condensers, Spark Plugs, Automotive Cable and Vesta Triangle Jack..."

Advertising for this jack in Trove spans the years 1951 to 1954. It is not know if production was limited to these dates. More info required.

Extract from 1984 Repco catalogue.

Info sought - do any of the bottle jacks have a Wylie mark or other identification on them?

There is a scissors type Wylie pictured below.

Can anyone supply pics or examples of wylie jacks?

Photo © Ozwrenches

Whylie Jack number 196-A-4, Triple Lift Screw Jack, Capacity 1200 LB (544 Kilos)

Low Height: 4-1/2", Raised Height: 12-1/8". Note that the missing handle for this has a 5/8" square end to enable driving the alloy winding mechanism.

This jack has a date stamp, but unreadable due to pitting: ?/? over 166.

This type comes with dates ranging from 1969 to about 1972 in the format MM/YY over 156 or 166, and I have seen it claimed that they were issued with Holden Motor Vehicles models HT through to HQ.

Info / confirmation sought

Pictured immediately below are the product identification and information as printed on the Wylie box shown below left

 

 

   
   

Photo © Ozwrenches

Wylie Scissors Jack

Close up of the decal showing instructions and the makers as:

"Manuf by W.H.Wylie & Co Ltd, Tonsley Park S A"

This is for FC & FE Holden cars and derivatives.

Note that the winder is a hooked type engaging the swinging connector at right.

 

Photo © Ozwrenches

Wylie Scissors Jack

Close up of the decal showing instructions and the makers as:

"Manuf by W.H.Wylie & Co Ltd, Tonsley Park S A"

This was for the FB & EK Holden cars.

Note the ratcheting handle for raising and lowering.

Blacksmith Made Wagon Jacks, mostly un-named, assumed to be Australian made  

Pic Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

 

 

Pics Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Pic Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Pic Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

This one looks like a Trewhella jack being used as a wagon jack

"Wagon Jacks" were an important part of horse drawn vehicle maintenance equipment. Because of the simple nayure of the bearings, the vehicle had to be raised a few inches to remove the wheels and grease the axle boxes or bearings. This was a regular maintenance chore, and the jack when used for this activity needed only a short lift to free the wheel, to allow its removal and lubrication. This activity differs from wheel removal incase of failure, and was designed to prevent this.

 

Pic Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

This one looks like a Trewhella jack being used as a wagon jack

Pics Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Blacksmith made lever action jack

Pics Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

Two more simple wagon jacks

Pics Courtesy © Dion Rinaldi

A sturdy wagon jack (sadly missing a few teeth from the ratchet)